SODIUM BICARBONATE INJECTION USP (sodium bicarbonate injection USP) Precautions

Medical Information
Canada
 

In order to provide you with relevant and meaningful content we need to know more about you.

Please choose the category that best describes you.

This content is intended for Canadian Healthcare Professionals. Would you like to proceed?

The aim of all bicarbonate therapy is to produce a substantial correction of the low total CO2 content and blood pH, but the risks of overdosage and alkalosis should be avoided. Hence, repeated fractional doses and periodic monitoring by appropriate laboratory tests are recommended to minimize the possibility of overdosage.

The potentially large loads of sodium given with bicarbonate require that caution be exercised in the use of sodium bicarbonate in patients with congestive heart failure or other edematous or sodium-retaining states, as well as in patients with oliguria or anuria.  See AVAILABILITY OF DOSAGE FORMS for amounts of sodium present in solutions.

Caution must be exercised in the administration of parenteral fluids, especially those containing sodium ions, to patients receiving corticosteroids or corticotropin.

Potassium depletion may predispose to metabolic alkalosis and coexistent hypocalcemia may be associated with carpopedal spasm as the plasma pH rises. These dangers can be mini­mized if such electrolyte imbalances are appropriately treated prior to or concomitantly with bicarbonate infusion.

Rapid injection (10 mL/min) of hypertonic Sodium Bicarbonate Injection USP solutions into neonates and children under two years of age may produce hypernatremia, a decrease in cere­brospinal fluid pressure and possible intracranial hemorrhage. The rate of administration in such patients should therefore be limited to no more than 8 mmol (mEq)/kg/day. A 4.2% solution may be preferred for such slow administration. In emergencies such as cardiac arrest, the risk of rapid infusion must be weighed against the potential for fatality due to acidosis.

The addition of sodium bicarbonate to parenteral solutions containing calcium should be avoided, except where compatibility has been previously established. Precipitation or haze may result from sodium bicarbonate-calcium admixtures.

Pregnancy

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with sodium bicarbonate.  It is also not known whether sodium bicarbonate can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.  Sodium bicarbonate should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.